To See The Invisible

"eclectic; avant-garde and spectral … plenty to chew over and to raise hopes for Howard’s future work"

The Times, Richard Morrison

"Oddly compelling … Howard’s idiom has a cool confidence and clarity of its own"

The Telegraph, Rupert Christiansen

"… it gets under the skin – a step into the future in Aldeburgh’s venerable tradition"

The Financial Times, Richard Fairman

"Emily Howard’s imaginative score ensures that this zeitgeist work is entirely her own"

Opera Now, Claire Jackson

"Howard’s menacing use of percussion and grainy-textured instrumental writing, variously monochrome and lush, capture the atmosphere. Her evocative score embraces other composers: a lute song by John Dowland, sung in a brothel scene in which pleasure and pain are played out with clinical horror, and the opening of the trio Soave il Vento, from Mozart’s Così fan Tutte. In Howard’s reworking, it shifts to a noodling, candy-sweet marimba-dominated melody, representing a world of “warmth”. Cacti thrive and a couple indulge themselves in “bagels, cookies, muffins and cupcakes, lemon and poppy seed, toffee and blueberry or double choc-chip”. Try singing that."

★★★★ - The Observer, Fiona Maddocks
more press

"Pastel-perfect hell … Howard confidently and consistently makes her music run hot and cold, and it’s a discomforting, intriguing listen … ambitious, experimental, and leaving us plenty to ponder."

bachtrach, Charlotte Valori

"Silverberg’s concept of a time when any emotion is outlawed was brought to vivid musical life … it has a Kafkaesque spookiness about it and should travel well if taken up elsewhere."

Musical America, Keith Clarke

Read about To See The Invisible:

‘We’ve got to open minds’: meet the composers reshaping opera

The Guardian, Flora Wilson

The Invisible Opera

JDCMB guest blog by Emily Howard: Jessica Duchen’s Classical Music Blog

Raus aus der Wärmestube

ZEIT ONLINE, Volker Hagedorn

Talking Heads: Emily Howard

arcana, Ben Hogwood

To See The Invisible and the song of the outcast

The Financial Times, Richard Fariman